Shredded Chicken Stew

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Choose FI has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Choose FI and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. Disclosures.

Shredded Chicken Stew

Course: Recipe
Servings

6

servings
Active Time

45

minutes
Total time

1

hour 

30

minutes
Cost Per Meal/Person

$2.65

My dad found this recipe in a magazine years ago. The name of the magazine is cut off so I don’t know where it’s from. The original recipe calls for rabbit meat, but we use chicken. So you’ll see the recipe constantly referring to rabbit. The recipe makes 6 servings, as written. We recently made this for our whole family while they were in town for Christmas and it made 12 servings by doubling the recipe.

Notes about the recipe:
• I left out the anchovy, bay leaves and thyme.
• I use 2 lb of boneless chicken thighs for the regular recipe; when we doubled it for our family I used 4-4.5 lb.
• We serve it over rice, instead of pappardelle noodles, although I’m sure that would be good too.
• I cook the chicken the same way the recipe says to cook the rabbit. When it’s all cooked after the 2 hours, 1 shred all of the chicken, instead of leaving some pieces large.

Ingredients

  • 2 lb. boneless chicken thighs

  • 1/4 cup olive oil

  • 1 anchovy (optional)

  • 1 onion, diced

  • 1 carrot, diced

  • 1 stalk celery, diced

  • Pinch of red-pepper flakes

  • 1 TBS minced garlic

  • 1 cup dry red wine

  • 1 cup seeded, chopped San Marzano tomatoes

  • 1 cup low-sodium chicken broth

  • 2 TBS unsalted butter, cut into pieces

  • 3 cups cooked white rice, for serving (or 12 oz pappardelle noodles)

Directions

  • Pat the chicken pieces dry and season with salt and pepper. In a Dutch oven over medium-high heat, add the oil and brown the pieces, working in batches if needed to avoid crowding. Transfer to a plate.
  • Reduce the heat to medium. Add the anchovy (if you choose) and mash it until it dissolves into the oil. Add the onion, carrots, and celery, stirring until soft, about 5 minutes. Then add the red pepper flakes, garlic, and tomato paste, stirring for another minute. Deglaze the pan with the wine, tum the heat to high and boil to burn off the alcohol, about 4 minutes. Add the tomatoes, broth, bay leaves, and thyme. Return the rabbit pieces to the pot, spacing them evenly so they are partly covered by the liquid. Bring to a boil and then reduce the heat and simmer, covered, until the rabbit is falling off the bone, about 2 hours, Turn the pieces at least once.
  • Turn off the heat and discard the thyme and bay leaves. Remove the rabbit from the sauce and let cool; then pull the meat from the bones. Shred some pieces and leave others large. Return the meat to the pan and simmer the sauce until thickened, 10 to 15 minutes. Stir in the butter, piece by piece. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Cook the pappardelle until al dente. Before draining, save a cup of the pasta water. Toss the pappardelle with the sauce over low heat, adding pasta water as necessary if the sauce is too thick. Divide among pasta bowls and top with the grated cheese.

Total Cost of meal

  • $8.50 4.25 lb boneless chicken thighs
    $2.50 2 cups red wine
    $1.25 Tomato paste+ crushed tomatoes
    $1 Rice
    $2 2 onions, carrot, celery, broth made from bouillon cubes
    $15.75 Total
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Choose FI has partnered with CardRatings for our coverage of credit card products. Choose FI and CardRatings may receive a commission from card issuers. Opinions, reviews, analyses & recommendations are the author’s alone, and have not been reviewed, endorsed or approved by any of these entities. Disclosures.
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